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Engine and Trans Pull...Out the top 2.5L Duratec V6

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Actually this is the same question asked by SERIALSTUNTER but for the 2.5L Duratec V6 Engine with a manual Transmition.

 

Please, before you answer this by saying........ "the sub-frame comes down with both intact"........I know this, and I know some say it's easier this way. But I want to know if anyone has ever pulled them as a unit out of the top of the engine bay.

 

I have only an engine lift but no car hoist. I don't care if it takes longer, I just want to know if it's possible and if anyone has ever done it this way and what is the best aproach. My car is a 2000 Contour 2.5l V6 with the manual transaxle.

 

Alternativly: If the best way is still to drop the whole frame, how high dos the car have to be lifted up? Any ideas how to best acomplish that is realy apriciated.

Thanksdrive1.gif

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...dropping the whole subframe etc WAS a better plan 1)When the cars were 'younger' 2) If you have a car hoist...BUT over time the front subframe mount bolts 'can' be a issue re spinning 'captive' nuts etc, have to cut open frame to hold very front mount bolt nuts etc..Out the top is fine, with care, hood off etc etc...I and many other owners have done it many imes.

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Out the top is fine, however you will need a leveler to angle the assembly a little while removing it. It will not come straight up and out (the master cylinder and booster unit are in the way).

 

-Dom

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...just watch out for the rad.Be sure to remove both the r/restrictor brackets off the trans,removing the trans shift tower(on an MTX) can help also watch the rear with the coil, also helps to remove the coil from the cam cover...

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I pulled my '95 V6 engine and manual trans out the top without major issues using a leveler after taking the struts and control arms off. Leave the A/C compressor with the car. The factory manual makess a decent checklist to follow to get ALL the bits loose before hoisting. The biggest grief for me were the fuel line disconnects.

 

Gar

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The roof of my carport is fairly low. I've used a leveler, but then I barely have enough space to clear the header panel, even with the car's subframe sitting on the concrete. I've pulled enough of them now, I can hook the chain on the hoist to get the angle just right as it comes out. The unit should be tilted so that the trans is lower than the engine.

 

The front exhaust manifold has a sharp edge that can snag and cut the A/C hose that runs along the header panel.

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...dropping the whole subframe etc WAS a better plan 1)When the cars were 'younger' 2) If you have a car hoist...BUT over time the front subframe mount bolts 'can' be a issue re spinning 'captive' nuts etc, have to cut open frame to hold very front mount bolt nuts etc..Out the top is fine, with care, hood off etc etc...I and many other owners have done it many imes.

 

 

 

You don't need to cut the frame to gain access to the bolts at all. Just lift up the carpet and go through the access panel right above the nuts.

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We've done it both way...once from the top and once from the bottom. Each way has it advantages and dis-advantages. Since you only have a shop crane it seems that you have little choice but to go from the top. I have heard of some pulls that they lift the car with the shop crane and then wheel the subframe out, but to me that sounds a little dangerous since the lower legs of the crane do not reach far enough under the car to stablize........good luck either way.

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Thank you all for your replies. I started to drain fluids and disconnect all mechanical and electrical connections I could see with the exception of the engine mounts.

 

What I am still not sure about is how , or better said, where to attach the chains to the engine block to safely lift the engine/transmission assembly out of the car.

 

I do have the Ford repair manual on order but I wanted to get the engine out as soon as possible.

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I dont know if this will help you out or not but I have a cd from ford that has a step by step instructions on how to remove and install the transaxel and engine, I used it when I needed to replace my trans and it has instructions on how to remove the engine as well I can give you the info on the cd if you would like.

 

 

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Some engines have two hooks while others only have one. Most of the later (99+) engines I've pulled only have one hook installed, near the water pump. Earlier engines tend to have a second hook installed on the block near the PCM (opposite corner from water pump). The hooks tend to bend when lifting the entire drivetrain. I have not had one cause damage or break, but they leave a witness mark on the cam cover.

 

Another method I've used.... disconnect the bolt (1 bolt on later models, 2 bolts on earlier models) from the upper engine bracket to passenger fender engine mount and run a chain under the bracket, careful to prevent it from interfering with the PS pulley. I remove the bolts from the upper trans mount and pass the other end of the chain under the cast portion of the mount. This method works best with a leveler because the chains are farther apart and different lengths.

 

Weather permitting, I'll be pulling another one this week. I'll take pics.

 

 

edit:

 

here's a pic from my gallery... this was the original engine in the '97. It had both hooks installed.

 

 

 

gallery_2786_155_147526.jpg

 

 

 

This is the 3L going into the '99. Only 1 hook was on this block. I believe the other end is bolted to the upper bracket.

 

gallery_2786_24_195573.jpg

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..I find a fabric engine lift sling/strap a better option than chains...Does less damage and allows better balance between the engine/trans assy for a straight lift...

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Chains are attached at upper engine bracket and trans bracket. The car is lowered as far as possible, but high enough to allow the cherry picker's legs to roll under the subframe.

 

gallery_2786_155_132643.jpg

gallery_2786_155_56129.jpg

gallery_2786_155_67986.jpg

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...you are making hard work of this. As I said, a fabric loop engine strap lets you sling round the trans and engine, with a couple of D shackles you can slide the pick up point with ease and adjust the C of G/ lift position to be straight Vs constant adjustment of hardware chains. Don't be put off by engine lift straps, they are very safe ...just look at the the material etc used in some tow straps, same material...I have lifted engines far heavier than the 2.5 with them. I think it's a mindset...if it's a heavy lump of engine then it needs a chain....those days are gone...

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I'm just using what I already have in my limited work area. I've worked with others that use old seat belts as fabric lifts. Scary to me, but worked fine.

 

 

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Is there an existing thread that contains a step-by-step write-up on the engine/trans removal?

 

I'd also like to know if one exists for dropping an ATX out the bottom.

 

Trying to determine which would be better than the other for doing a trans exchange.

 

Scott

Detroit

1998 SE 2.5/ATX

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