Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Terry Haines

2.0 V8 power...

Recommended Posts

Quoted from RCE News:

 

"LDM’s new 2.0-litre racing V8

A 2.0-litre V8 race engine built by Linton Design and Manufacture in Aylesbury UK, has been unveiled. This brand new unit is aimed at amateur and semi-pro’ motorsport, particularly hillclimbing and sprinting.

Designed with the help of experienced engine man Slim Cameron the 90-degree V8 runs a flat-plane crank and 32 valves operated by four camshafts. Virtually everything is CNC machined by the company including the crankcase, cylinder heads, cam carriers, oil pumps and throttle bodies. With a near 1.5:1 bore:stroke ratio the engine is designed to rev to 13,000rpm and deliver 350bhp.

Neat features include a very low crank axis and the strength to be used as a fully stressed member. Coupled with a mere 75kg (165lb) weight the company expects it to be a very attractive package.

Linton Design and Manufacture specialises in CNC work and includes TVR among its many clients. This is its first complete engine. The unit will be displayed on the Newman Cams stand at January’s Autosport Engineering show, Birmingham UK."

 

Pic below.

 

-Dom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe my small brain would turn to a liquid state if I were in the same room as such a beast. :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Stock_tour04

remember it is only 2.0L...cylinders ae the size of golf balls...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was scouring the web for details about LDM's engine I found this:

 

-----------------------------------------------------------

Quaife’s Radical thinking

Gearbox specialist Quaife Engineering and sportscar manufacturer Radical have released details of their collaboration to produce a high performance V8 race engine suitable for smaller racecars.

Radical says that it has completed the detailed design phase of the engine, which will be available in 2.0-litre and 2.6-litre formats, weighing 75kg (165lb) and with an expected power output of over 400bhp in full race specification.

Quaife will now proceed with the design and manufacture of an integral six-speed gearbox and drive system for transverse installations and an all-new lightweight sequential six-speed gearbox for in-line applications.

The engine will feature a small number of Suzuki parts, with all manufactured components machined at Radical’s in-house machine shop, Amicon. The engines are to be assembled and dynoed at Radical’s in-house engine division, Powertec.

Mike Quaife, managing director of Quaife Engineering, said: ‘This latest project will enable us to demonstrate all our drive system skills including computerised design, pattern making, manufacturing etc. and we have a few ideas on how to make these sequential boxes even sweeter than Radical’s current units.’

The two companies have worked together since 1997, with all Radical cars incorporating the Quaife torque biased, LSD and its SR3 car featuring a Quaife gear drive system with integral reverse gear and LSD. The new Radical SR4 is also said to incorporate a unique chain drive differential, jointly developed by the two companies.

 

Source: Racecar Engineering http://www.racecar-engineering.com/content...t/news/news.htm

--------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Sorry about moving away from the LDM engine but this Quaife/Radical unit seems like its very similar. Aren't you a Quaife dealer Terry? :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...yes I'm a Quaife dealer & Quaife is a UK company(I'm British!)...The Radical setup is using 4 cylinder motorcycle engines with very high outputs per litre.....I'm sure that the bulk of owners in the US would baulk at the high revs as they all want 'Buick torque' at low revs...even out of a Duratec ..,'torque wins races'...nope...if that were the case NASCAR engines would be in F1.....HP per litre & power to weight ratio wins races!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may be in the market for one as long as it'll be cheaper than buying a newer car. She's gonna bite the dust one day, they all do. I am really attached to this car in an odd kinda way though and will keep her alive as long as possible. But who knows, I may find myself in a focus before the year is up anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well big torque engines may not be whats needed to win races but they're certainly great for entertainment. :burnout Jack Sears won the 1963 British Saloon Car Championship with a 427 Galaxie but lost out to Jim Clark next year who drove a tiny Lotus-Ford Cortina that made only about a 1/5 or 1/4 of the power of that big Galaxie.

 

Anyway, how accessible do you think these engines will be to a regular amateur enthusiast with a decent job who wants to use it in a track-day car? I guess I can assume they will cost much more than one of those new Ford 5.0L "Cammer" crate engines but are these engines going to accessable to anybody but the super rich-guy or semi/professional race teams?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

....smaller cylinders and more of them ALWAYS make more HP than a few 'BIG BORES'...think about it....the gas burns at the same speed ...big or small bore...it takes LONGER for a 'BIG BORE' engine to burn the gas in the cylinder Vs a small cylinder....flame has further to travel in a BIG Vs small bore from the spark plug to the cylinder wall....the shorter the distance the quicker it burns....basic stuff to me! :wink...as an 'edit'...most of these engines run with a very high theoretical CR...BUT with long duration cams this is lower for the effective CR....same with any 'hot cam'...it lowers the CR of the engine.... :wink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Stock_tour04

i still prefer a big v8/v10 for muscle cars, v/12 for pastarockets and the nice, peppy 2.0L in my contour. i agree with what your saying, after all it makes sense, i just stated a fact, the cyliners are gonna be the size of golf ballz. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Stock_tour04

yeah i dot doubt it, whats this new 2.0 V8 gonna sound like? is it gonna have a mustang sound? or a honda S2000 sound? (either way is fine ith me :woot )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL! Maybe if one of us has a HUGE trust fund, and wants to contribute for the rest of us. I want one real bad, but I work as a manager at Burger King til I graduate this coming winter. That equals about the cost of the motor as my anual salary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Stock_tour04

i can see the civic owners (aka ricers, well some of them at least) flocking to it when this thing hits the market. if it ever does...will it be applicable in hondas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...Hp per litre & power to weight ratio wins races![/b]

Finally someone said it. Tell this to all the mullett wearing, offroad driving hick teachers at my school. To them nascar is GOD...and whatever Dale Earnhart endores, it must be gold.

 

-Tim B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
..,'torque wins races'...nope...if that were the case NASCAR engines would be in F1.....HP per litre & power to weight ratio wins races! [/b]

torque wins 1/4 mile drag races :)

 

sadly that is what matters to most of us americans!

 

id rather have a high rpm screamer and take it on a nice road course :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest holycowpaul

High revving HP engines might win F1 races and put out tons of high output power but they aren't as fuel efficient as torque motors. Power efficient, yes, but not fuel as efficient. There is usually a trade off and differently engineered or tuned engines serve different purposes---Go read the RX-8 BB's--High output, poor fuel economy. Of course, who cares about fuel efficiency when racing, for the most part.

 

Long duration cams effect dynamic compression 'though static compression is fixed. Longer duration cams need more compression.

 

Although bigger bore engines might make comparably less power than multi-cylinder small bore engines (because of the flame travel issue) a bigger bored to stroke ratio typically makes for a higher power output motor by pushing the revs up the scale. Also--drawback--the more cylinders, the more internal friction. The old Jag motors needed a lot of battery power to turn the car over, if I'm not mistaken. Everything is a trade-off in everything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

....i'm sorry but the 2 valve set up came to the end of its life 20-30 years ago.I understand your support for the 'ol gal but you need to move on to the new ideas and output etc of multi valves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.