Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Terry Haines

2.0 V8 power...

Recommended Posts

Guest holycowpaul

"The engine's unique two-valve hemispherical combustion chamber within an aluminum head provides impressive air flow, torque and power (hallmarks of the original), and gives the engine its throaty rumble. Fifty-six pounds lighter than the 5.9-liter V-8, the 5.7-liter Hemi produces 41% more power and 12% more peak torque."

 

It's a 2 valve design. Sorry

 

 

http://www.allpar.com/mopar/new-mopar-hemi.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Hemi is a pent-roof design isn't it? Not a real 'Hemi'.

 

Peugeot used hemi (or maybe a pent-roof) design combustion chambers in their Grand Prix cars in 1912 or 1913 I believe. Ford created a V8 during war-time to power the Sherman tank (GAA, GAN, GAP) with hemi combustion chambers, DOHC's, aluminium block... quite a high level of exotica for the time. Was based on a V12 aircraft engine they were developing (remember Ford was the largest commercial airline producer before the war - the Tin Goose?) and were inspired from the Merlin and Allison aircraft engines of the time. Made more torque than a Buick.... 1050 ft-lbs. and 500 hp but I don't think it can rev easly past 3000 rpm. In the late 1940's Ardun (Arkus-Duntov) made a hemi head conversion for the flathead Ford V8 and Joe Davis also made a DOHC conversion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...Bentley had 4 valves and pent roof in the Le Mans cars around 1910'ish....Hemi re Jag was late 30's re XK engine by the engineer Haynes for Lyons at Jag.....all 'old stuff'....anyway you cut it 4 valves or 5 are better than two 'big ones' due the the lighter weight of two small Vs one big ...and the increased valve curtian area of 2 Vs one....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess the engineers way back then definitely knew how to make power but may not have had the means to put that knowledge into mass production. So when are we going to see a camless engine? Another 50 years?

 

Ford's GAA/GAN/GAP tank engines in WWII had 4 vavles per cylinder. Any truth to the notion that 2-vavles per cylinder can make more torque? Those tank engines made over 1000 lbs-ft mind you that their displacements were enormous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...here is another 2.0 V8 from Moto Power 'RST V8' FIVE valves per cylinder, 340 BHP @ 10,200 rpm ,190 lbs /ft @ 7800 rpm, 104 lbs ft @ 1300 rpm...around 15,000 UK Pounds....or the Cylclone2.0 Y40R...302 BHP @ 10,000rpm, 171 lbs ft @ 8,500 rpm, 109 lbs ft @ 2000 rpm........the list of small capacity multi valve V8 race engines goes on...this is the shape of thing to come... :wink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Track day specials seem to be springing up everywhere in the UK. Seems like everytime I buy a British car magazine, there is always a new track-day cars like the Palmer/Jaguar JP1, or a new track-day car engine like the ones mentioned above. Tons of ads for track-day vacations and pro track-day preparation services. I even saw ads for car storage that were on or very close to a road course aimed at track-day fanatics. I wonder why this phenomenon hasn't caught on anywhere else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because this is the US. We couldn't handle speeds in excess of 75MPH here without utter regard for safety and road manners.

 

Personally, I wish they'd open an Autobahn here - Somewhere closer that I could get my fill of speed without the consequence of a hefty fine. But then you have all the naysayers that will want to bring their SUV's there and float along dangerously at 100+... Makes me think I'd be safer on the highway after all.

 

-Dom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest holycowpaul

As has been pointed out, what we now deem 'high tech' and new technology, really isn't. Just because the American market followed big inch push rod design, doesn't make those engines 'antiques'. Terry, although I can respect your bias for dual overhead cams and multi-valves (and I can't say I disagree) I think you are letting your biases cloud you from admitting the truth in the matter. Everything is a compromise in everything. The appeal for pushrod engines is that they allow for more compact design and packaging. In other words, a pushrod engine could be made 'larger' displacement wise all the while maintaining the same packaging as a smaller dual over head design. I can't remember, wasn't there a racing forum several years back that made concessions for pushrod engines to compete with over head cammers by allowing bigger displacements? If I remember correctly, those engines were performing rather well. You can cry foul by saying it's a bigger displacement engine and no fair but that is the inherent comparative adavante to a push rod engine. It allows for more displacent within the same size constraints. Hence we get more torque and better fuel economy. Of course such an engine won't compete on the F1 circuit but it sure makes for a good street engine. It surely does the job well in a truck. Everything is a trade-off in everything and for Dodge to come out with a hemi I think is more than just a marketing ploy. If I remember, Chrysler was a clean sheet design---Same with Chevy and the LS1.

 

Last I checked, the new hemi made the 10 best motors of the year.

 

BTW, the last jag 12 cylinder engine sucked. Sorry, I know that attacks at the heart of your British nationalism. And the last I checked, jag is now a ford. har har.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Because this is the US. We couldn't handle speeds in excess of 75MPH here without utter regard for safety and road manners.

 

Personally, I wish they'd open an Autobahn here - Somewhere closer that I could get my fill of speed without the consequence of a hefty fine. But then you have all the naysayers that will want to bring their SUV's there and float along dangerously at 100+... Makes me think I'd be safer on the highway after all.

 

-Dom [/b]

Well, track-day events usually occur in a closed road course so there's no danger to the general public. Personally I'd love to be able to take a car (many track-day events are open to all sorts of cars) to a track-day event, pay a fee and run it on a road course for x amount of time. That is, after I get the proper driver training, of course. It is much more appealing to me than going to a drag strip or an auto-x event.

 

Cars like, say the ERA from Tiger Motorsports that is pictured on HMS's gallery. You can tell that thing is made for the track-day fanatic (or those who wants to participate in their one make racing series). It drives like an 60's single seater but the Zetec is easy to maintain, people over 6ft can drive it comfortably, relatively cheap.... Then the z100wr with two Kawasaki engines. Ford RS200 Evo still holds the record for fastest 0-60 time but that's probably because the z100wr may not be considered a production car. But definitely a track car rather than an everyday kit-car/replica. Now you have all these small high-reving V8's springing up from the UK.

 

Autobahns are not all that they are cracked up to be. I've never been on a German autobahn but I've regularly travelled on the Portuguese A1 that, like the autobahn, has no speed limits. Its the highway that joins the capital Lisbon to Coimbra and then Porto; Portugal's three principle cities. Of course, its thrilling the first few times but after that, travelling at 180-220 km/h gets pretty boring... there is hardly any curves. Its like travelling down an Interstate. The only excitement is the kind that you don't want... like a Fiat Punto cutting you off. There are areas of heavy traffic near cities or during rush hours where you must slow down considerably for long periods of time. The Portuguese highway is fairly modern but I heard that some sections of the German autobahn date back to the Third Reich.

 

BTW, I think the Jaguar V12 was an excellent engine. It was made for the XJ13 (gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous car) to challenge for the World Championship and wins at Le Mans back in the 60's. Kind of got lost in the Ford vs Ferrari war at the time. The V12 eventually did win Le Mans on multiple occasions.

 

Here's some good info on it.

http://www.jagweb.com/jagworld/v12-engine/index.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest holycowpaul

Well at least I got you to concede something. You're not pissed with me? You'll still help me fix my car next time I email you in a panic? Eh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In re standards for driving, Autobahn, etc.

 

Yes, Terry, you are absolutely correct. First, just to obtain a license in Germany, you have to go through a process that in the US is only matched by getting a pilot's license! Classroom, X hours, documented; followed by dual driving, with a licensed instructor (not dear ol' Dad), also minimum number of documented (in a logbook) hours; then followed by"solo" (not autocross) in a vehicle followed by a licensed instructor, also with a set minimum numberr of logged hours. After that, you can sign up to take the exams, written and practical -- and oh, did I forget to mention, you must also be trained in first aid and pass both types of exams for that. [Germany has a Good Samaritan law with TEETH! If you don't stop and render aid, you can be fined, go to jail, or both, depending on the outcome.] Last time I checked in the 70's, the cost for the average German to get a license was in the neighborhood of $2000 for schools, etc. Then you add to that traffic laws with teeth, too: just get caught passing on the right some time, or speeding in a construction zone, for example.

 

As one who had pretty close to a perfect Autobahn sleeper at one time (1975 Chev Cosworth Vega), I had quite a bit of experience in the late seventies & 1983. My German neighbors wanted to know where I had gotten a "mini-camaro". I kept it in immaculate trim until cheap-a$$ stamped GM sheetmetal rusted in critical places, causing rear axle to try to go in two different directions at once (now there's a rush for you at 120 kph on a back road). But back to the subject, there was nothing more frightening then seeing a 20-year-old GI in a big block muscle car as old as he was, with USA tags, trying to prove he could keep up with a whale-tail 911. :rolleyes: Yes, Virginia, the real Autobahn DOES have some curves, and the main highways abound with twisties, switchbacks, and all kinds of interesting obstacles like tractors and manure wagons!

 

 

Just my $0.02 on driving in Germany.

 

BTW, for those who would like to wind out their higher revving sports sedans in the eastern Midwest, check out www.racenasa.com for the HPDE (track days) events this yer. MidOhio, BeaverRun, Gingerman, Putnam Park, Nashville Speedway (in three weeks!?!), and RoadAmerica are all on the venue this year. C'mon out & play! LOTs of seat time, good instruction, and high speed in a safe, controlled environment an the same tracks and days as there are also actual race sessions. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Stock_tour04

i agree 100%. i paid good money to go to Skip Barber driving school, and it was the best investment i have made thus far in my life. you dont realize how many people out there cant drive until you learn to REALLy drive yourself. :burnout i had a blast in the vipers...

 

now if only they would create a HEMI v10 and stick that under the hood of the snake...we're talking 650 HP from the factory! :burnout :burnout :burnout :burnout :burnout :burnout :burnout :burnout :punk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.